The Israeli Palestinian Conflict

News of Terrorism and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict (July 1 – 7, 2020)

There was an increase in tension on Israel's southern border this past week when three rockets were launched at Israel from the Gaza Strip. Protests against Israel's intention to annex parts of Judea and Samaria continued, culminating in a "day of rage" in Gaza and demonstrations (not attended as well as expected) in Judea and Samaria. Jibril Rajoub, secretary of Fatah's Executive Committee, and Saleh al-'Arouri, deputy head of Hamas' political bureau, held an exceptional (virtual) joint press conference. In the meantime, most of the PA's attention and efforts are focused on dealing with the spike in the number of COVID-19 cases in Judea and Samaria.
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The spread of COVID-19 continues to spiral in Judea and Samaria compared to the low number of patients in the Gaza Strip (Updated to July 6, 2020)

The number of active cases in Judea and Samaria continues to spiral in the second wave of the COVID-19 outbreak. The number of active cases throughout the PA is 3,758, compared to 1,620 last week (updated to the evening of July 5, 2020). A total of 3,150 active cases are from the Hebron District (compared to 1,334 cases last week), accounting for about 84% of all active cases in Judea and Samaria.
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Palestinian Authority and Fatah responses to the ramming attack in Abu Dis show their support for this type of popular terrorism attack

Ramming attacks are a common, deadly modus operandi carried out as part of the Palestinian Authority (PA) and Fatah's strategy of "popular resistance" [i.e., popular terrorism]. The concept of "popular resistance," which replaced the concept of armed struggle, includes the political-popular-economic-propaganda-legal campaign the PA wages against Israel. The "popular resistance" is not the non-violent strategy publicly touted by the PA leadership or the rhetoric the PA uses when dealing with the West.
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News of Terrorism and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict (June 24 – 30, 2020)

The situation in the Gaza Strip, Judea and Samaria heated up this past week. Two rockets were launched at Israeli territory from the Gaza Strip. In Judea and Samaria the number active COVID-19 cases continues to spike, and reached 1,924 (as of June 30, 2020), most of them in the Hebron district. As July 1 approaches, the date on which Israeli law will be imposed on parts of Judea and Samaria, the volume of threats from Hamas and the other terrorist organizations is increasing. In the Gaza Strip preparations are being made for "popular activities" as part of a "day of rage" on July 1, 2020. The Palestinian Authority (PA) continues its diplomatic activity in the international arena to deter Israel from implementing its annexation intentions.
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The number of new coronavirus cases in Judea and Samaria continues to spike while in the Gaza Strip the numbers are low and the situation is so far under control

The numbers of COVID-19 cases in Judea and Samaria continue to spike in what the Palestinian Authority (PA) considers a second coronavirus wave. Most of the PA's preventive measures are focused in the Hebron district, which is in full lockdown. The spikes in the numbers of active cases in Judea and Samaria are in stark contrast to the positive situation in the Gaza Strip, despite its potential for mass infection. This past week the number of Palestinian workers entering and leaving Israel increased, both legally (through the crossings) and illegally (through holes in the fence).
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The Palestinian Authority takes practical steps to set up a government bank to handle payments to prisoners and families of shaheeds

a government bank which will serve as a channel for transferring funds to prisoners and families of shaheeds. The establishment of the new bank was intended to bypass the order issued by the Commander of the IDF Central Command prohibiting banks from providing banking services to prisoners and families of shaheeds in Judea and Samaria. In the wake of the order, several Palestinian and Arab banks announced a freeze on the bank accounts of prisoners and families of shaheeds. On the other hand, Mahmoud Abbas and PA officials again pledged to transfer the funds to the prisoners and families of shaheeds, calling them a “red line” and “sacred salaries.”
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The Israeli Palestinian Conflict

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is a nationalist conflict between two peoples living in the Land of Israel: the Jewish people and the Palestinian people. The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is more than 100 years old and has been given worldwide prominence. The roots of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict go back to the 19th century, when nationalist movements gained momentum around the world, among them the Zionist movement and the call to emigrate to the Land of Israel to build a national home for the Jewish People. The Israeli-Palestinian conflict took a nationalist turn and grew after the First World War. 

The issues at the heart of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict include the permanent borders, security arrangements, Israel’s demand for Palestinian recognition of the existence of the Jewish People, the status of the Palestinian refugees, the control of Jerusalem, the Israeli settlements in Judea and Samaria, the distribution of water resources and the distribution of additional resources in Judea and Samaria.

A prominent feature of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is the severe manifestations of violence and terrorism in the Gaza Strip and Judea and Samaria that have accompanied it throughout the years of its existence. The fighting is carried out by terror squads and individuals. These manifestations of violence have led to many losses and property damage on both sides.

Over the years, many attempts have been made to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Most of the proposals attempted to promote a permanent solution that would involve the creation of Palestinian autonomy or an independent Palestinian state to be established alongside the State of Israel. This is known as the “two-state solution.” Another proposed solution for resolving the conflict is a “one-state solution” whereby all of the western Land of Israel, including the Gaza Strip and Judea and Samaria, would become a binational state. The attempts were unsuccessful due to disagreements over the nature of the solution and due to a basic lack of trust between the sides.