General Information

News of Terrorism and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict (September 9 – 15, 2020)

In the Gaza Strip Hamas is directing most of its attention and effort towards halting the rapid spread of Covid-19. The PA and Hamas criticized the Arab League for not condemning the UAE's normalization agreement with Israel, which left an opening for Bahrain (and other Arab states) to sign similar agreements. This past week al-Jazeera TV broadcast a program about the Izz al-Din Qassam Brigades' [Hamas' military-terrorist wing's] military capabilities, in ITIC assessment at the request of Hamas.
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The Spread of Covid-19 in Gaza Strip, Judea and Samaria (Updated to September 14, 2020)

The sharp rise in the extent of Covid-19 infection continues. According to the ministry of health in Gaza, the real number of active cases is far higher because many people have not been tested. The Hamas administration continues the strict enforcement of preventive measures with an emphasis on the ban on gatherings, although with occasional exceptions. This past week 3,597 new Covid-19 cases were detected in Judea and Samaria. The number of active case has risen in all the Palestinian Authority (PA) districts. In east Jerusalem the slight decline in the number of new active cases continues, and the general trend is towards stability. The Palestinian terrorist organizations (especially Hamas and the Palestinian Islamic Jihad) expressed concern over the rise in the number of Palestinians in Israeli jails infected with Covid-19, and accused Israel of neglect (Palinfo, al-Mayadeen, September 8, 2020).
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News of Terrorism and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict (September 2 – 8, 2020)

Since understandings for a lull were reached on the night of August 31, 2020, the Gaza Strip has been quiet. In Judea and Samaria popular terrorism continued. This past week a combined ramming-attempted stabbing attack was carried out at the Tapuah Junction in Samaria (wounding an IDF soldier and Israeli policeman. This past week the Israeli Security Agency detained an Israeli citizen with an Israeli Bedouin mother and a Gazan father, suspected of having been recruited by the Izz al-Din Qassam Brigades, Hamas' military wing. He was instructed to place an IED at a bus stop at a major intersection in the center of Israel.
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The Spread of Covid-19 in Gaza Strip, Judea and Samaria (Updated to September 7, 2020).

In the Gaza Strip the sharp rise in the active number of Covid-19 cases continued this past week. The Hamas administration has taken a variety of preventive measures, including a lockdown of the northern Gaza Strip and Gaza City, the two main epicenters of the disease. The spokesman for the ministry of health in Gaza said that the spike continues to rise out of control. A delegation of Palestinian Authority (PA) ministers, headed by Mai al-Kayla, minister of health, entered the Gaza Strip through the Erez Crossing.
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News of Terrorism and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict (August 26 – September 1, 2020)

The Hamas-initiated tension along the Gaza Strip border, which has continued for nearly a month, apparently came to an end this past week. On the night of August 31, 2020, after several rounds of mediation conducted by the Qatari representative, Hamas announced both sides had agreed to end the escalation and return to the status quo ante.According to the Lebanese and Palestinian media, the understandings reached included the following: the renewal of the fuel deliveries, the delivery of medical equipment necessary to deal with Covid-19, an increase in the amount of electricity, the full restoration of the fishing zone, and beginning the international "strategic projects" in the industrial zone.
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The Spread of COVID-19 in Judea, Samaria and the Gaza Strip (Updated to August 31, 2020)

Since the first four cases of Covid-19 were detected inside the Gaza Strip on August 24, 2020, there has been a significant increase in the number of new infections. On August 31, 2020, the total number of active cases stood at 280, 243 inside the Gaza Strip and 37 who returned from abroad. As of August 31, 2020 there have been four deaths. The number of active cases in the Palestinian Authority (PA) also rose this past week: 2,843 new cases were detected, up from 2,324 a week ago.
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General Information

For decades, the Palestinian terrorist organizations have waged a vicious war against the State of Israel, starting in the 1920s and 1930s, causing untold bloodshed. Their mass-casualty suicide bombing attacks claimed hundreds of victims. After the Six Day War, Palestinian terrorism accelerated and the number of terrorist attacks in Israel and abroad against Jewish and Israeli targets increased.

During the 1970s, planes were hijacked by terrorists from the Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine and the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine.  After the Black September events (the removal of terrorists from Jordan in 1970), most prominent were terrorist attacks abroad carried out by a terrorist group from the Fatah organization calling itself Black September. Those attacks culminated in 1972, when 11 Israeli sportsmen were murdered at the Munich Olympics. Trans-border terrorist attacks were also carried out (attacks from Jordan until 1970 and attacks from the Lebanese border in the 1970s), some of them targeting Israeli civilians. In the 1990s, suicide bombing attacks became the main form of struggle carried out by the Palestinians, first by the radical Islamic organizations, primarily Hamas, and later also by secular organizations such as Fatah. 


There was a significant increase in terrorist attacks during the Palestinian terrorist campaign of 2000-2005 (known as the Al-Aqsa or Second Intifada), during which a great many attacks were carried out, including many suicide bombing attacks which disrupted daily life in Israel and threatened its large cities. The second half of 2015 and early 2016 witnessed a wave of terror characterized by lone-wolf attacks, mainly stabbing, vehicular and shooting attacks.