Spotlight on Iran (Week of December 7-14, 2011)

Spotlight on Iran

Spotlight on Iran

Spotlight on Iran

Spotlight on Iran

Spotlight on Iran

Spotlight on Iran

Spotlight on Iran

Spotlight on Iran

U.S. drone crash in Iranian territory brings joy and protest

U.S. drone crash in Iranian territory brings joy and protest

http://sikhoonak.blogfa.com

http://sikhoonak.blogfa.com

Annual battle for approval of national budget begins

Annual battle for approval of national budget begins

Iran responds to Battlefield 3 with Assault on Tel-Aviv

Iran responds to Battlefield 3 with Assault on Tel-Aviv

Pistachio nuts, pre-Islamic tradition, and politics

Pistachio nuts, pre-Islamic tradition, and politics

Production of brooms in Mazandaran Province

Production of brooms in Mazandaran Province

Production of brooms in Mazandaran Province

Production of brooms in Mazandaran Province

Production of brooms in Mazandaran Province

Production of brooms in Mazandaran Province

Production of brooms in Mazandaran Province

Production of brooms in Mazandaran Province

Production of brooms in Mazandaran Province

Production of brooms in Mazandaran Province


Spotlight on Iran
Spotlight on Iran
Spotlight on Iran

Highlights of the week

  • U.S. drone crash in Iranian territory brings joy and protest

  • Outrage in Iran over opening of U.S. "virtual embassy”

  • Annual battle for approval of national budget begins

  • Iran responds to Battlefield 3 with Assault on Tel-Aviv

  • Pistachio nuts, pre-Islamic tradition, and politics

  • Pictures of the week: production of brooms in Mazandaran Province

U.S. drone crash in Iranian territory brings joy and protest

This week Iranian media extensively covered the crash of the U.S. RQ-170 drone in Iranian territory. Iran portrayed the crash of the drone as a significant technological and military achievement and strongly protested the incursion into its air space.

The daily Keyhan referred to the incident as an unprecedented technological and military achievement for Iran, and a severe defeat for the United States in its intelligence campaign against Iran. An editorial published by the daily, titled "Strategic blow”, said that the policy of pressure and sanctions has been unable to compromise Iran’s status and strength, and that while President Obama continues making statements and threats against Iran, the latter clearly demonstrates its scientific, technological, intelligence, and military strength.

In another article, the daily said that Iran has yet to reveal all that it’s capable of, and that the United States, Britain, and Israel cannot take a military action against it as they are unaware of its military abilities. Iran has surprised the United States by bringing down the drone just as Hezbollah surprised Israel with its capabilities in the second Lebanon war. The exposure of the American agents who operated in Iran and Lebanon and the downing of the drone indicate that the intelligence nightmares of the United States are coming true one by one.

The daily Javan also said that, if anything, the pressure and sanctions against Iran only strengthened its technological and military progress, and that the capture of the drone proves that the Americans are incapable of waging the same kind of classical electronic war against Iran as they did against Iraq in 2003. The newspaper also argued that the capture of the drone reflects a new Iranian strategy, one based on threat for threat. According to this strategy, Iran will no longer simply react to threats against it, but will also launch its own initiatives.

The enthusiasm over the downing of the drone was accompanied by vehement protest of its incursion into Iranian air space. The Foreign Ministry protested the drone’s invasion to the ambassadors of Switzerland and Afghanistan in Tehran, while Iran’s representative to the U.N. sent a letter to that organization’s secretary-general condemning the incursion of the drone and demanding that effective, clear action be taken against the United States to put an end to its actions, which, he said, contradict the U.N. charter and violate Iran’s sovereignty.

Outrage in Iran over opening of U.S. "virtual embassy”

The launch of the online U.S. embassy drew strong criticism from Iran, which claimed that the embassy will be used for espionage and subversion and is part of the psychological warfare campaign waged by the United States against Iran. Just one day after it was launched, the virtual embassy website was blocked by the Iranian authorities.

Foreign Ministry Spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast said that launching the embassy will not help the United States make up for the big mistake it did when it cut off its relations with the Iranian people, and will not enable the United States to send a different message to Iranians than the one it has been sending for the past several decades by imposing sanctions, making false accusations, and providing support for anti-Iranian terrorist organizations. Intelligence Minister Heydar Moslehi defined the virtual embassy as a trap designed to recruit spies in Iran.

Strong criticism against the launch of the virtual embassy was also heard from the Majles. Esma’il Kowsari, deputy chairman of the Majles National Security and Foreign Policy Committee, said that, as long as the American administration does not change its policy towards Iran, the Iranian people will not believe its two-faced policy. He claimed that the launch of the virtual embassy is another way for Iran’s enemies to attain their objectives, and estimated that it will remain online for no more than six months to a year. Hashmatollah Falahatpisheh, chairman of the Majles Foreign Relations Committee, said that the virtual embassy has been established for purposes of espionage and is part of an American initiative to step up pressure on Iran.

Iran’s conservative media also reacted strongly to the launch of the virtual U.S. embassy. The daily Javan said that the embassy’s objective is to collect intelligence on the internal situation in Iran. In recent years the United States has attempted to collect intelligence on Iran from its embassies in neighboring countries by contacting Iranian citizens, and it now aims to collect intelligence through the virtual embassy without causing problems for the citizens interested in contacting it.

Fars News Agency claimed that the launch of the embassy goes against international treaties on diplomatic relations between countries, and called on the Iranian authorities to lodge a complaint to international authorities against the United States.

Annual battle for approval of national budget begins

Earlier this week the government approved the main points of the national budget for the next Iranian year (March 2011-March 2012), and is expected to submit it to the approval of the Majles in the next several days. As in the past, the political power struggle between the Majles and the government will likely come into play during the discussions on the approval of the budget, particularly when considering how close they are to the next Majles elections, slated for this coming March.

Majles Deputy Speaker Mohammad-Reza Bahonar reported this week that, so far, Majles Speaker Ali Larijani has sent to the president two official letters demanding that he submit the budget proposal to the Majles as soon as possible. During a Majles session, Majles member Mostafa Kavakebian warned that unless the budget is submitted in the next several days, severe problems may arise, since Majles members will be busy with the election campaign in the next several weeks.

Mehr News Agency reported that the budget proposal which the government intends to submit to the approval of the Majles will likely address the impact of the economic sanctions imposed on Iran, and discuss scenarios that will provide a response to the possible drop in state revenues in case the sanctions become more severe.

Meanwhile, a senior official in the Supreme Audit Court of Iran (SAC) confirmed this week that Iran’s national budget showed a deficit in the first six months of the current Iranian year (March-September 2011). Majles member Seyyed Reza Akrami also discussed the budget deficit and said experts believe that this year’s deficit will reach 40 thousand billion tomans (nearly 37 billion dollars).

Iran responds to Battlefield 3 with Assault on Tel-Aviv

Behrouz Mina’i, chairman of the National Foundation for Computer Games, reported this week that Iranian game designers are currently hard at work on the video game Assault on Tel-Aviv in response to Battlefield 3, a game recently banned by the Iranian authorities.

Mina’i said that Iran’s strategy is based on "attack for attack”, and since the United States is ruled by Israel and is more concerned with an attack on Tel-Aviv than on Washington, Iran will respond to Battlefield 3 by developing the video game Assault on Tel-Aviv.

Several weeks ago Iranian authorities decided to impose a total ban on selling the game Battlefield 3, which portrays a U.S. attack on Iran. In addition, thousands of Iranian youngsters signed an online petition to protest the game.

In recent years the Iranian authorities have made use of computer games as part of their efforts to promote the regime’s objectives with domestic public opinion. Among other things, the National Foundation for Computer Games has produced games on the Islamic revolution, the Iran-Iraq War, and the nuclear program. The foundation, established in 2006 and supervised by the Ministry of Islamic Guidance, aims to monitor Iran’s video game industry and promote the distribution of computer games that encourage the values of the revolution and the regime. 

Pistachio nuts, pre-Islamic tradition, and politics

The chairman of Iran’s Pistachio Association reported this week that pistachio prices have gone up by 10 to 15 percent this year as a result of a considerable decrease in pistachio production and the local currency’s loss against the U.S. dollar. He said that 150 thousand tons of pistachio nuts were harvested across the country this past year, 40 thousand tons less than the preceding year. Forty thousand tons were exported by Iran abroad, mostly to China.

In recent years the Iranian pistachio market is undergoing a severe crisis driven mostly by drought and water shortage in Kerman Province. The province, particularly the city of Rafsanjan (the ancestral home of the Rafsanjani family, which includes Expediency Discernment Council Chairman Ali-Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani), is the center of pistachio production in Iran.

The chairman of the Pistachio Association stressed that, despite the decrease in the supply of pistachios, the nuts will not be in shortage ahead of Yalda, which will be marked next week in Iran. Yalda Night (December 21), the longest night of the year, symbolizes the beginning of the winter season. The holiday dates back to the Zoroastrian tradition. It is a time when Iranian families traditionally get together and eat dried fruit, watermelons, and pomegranates. Like the Iranian New Year (Nowruz), the regime attempted to abolish the Yalda festivities after the Islamic revolution, but without success.

 

U.S. drone crash in Iranian territory brings joy and protest

This week Iranian media extensively covered the crash of the U.S. RQ-170 drone in Iranian territory. Iran portrayed the crash of the drone as a significant technological and military achievement and strongly protested the incursion into its air space.

After it crashed, the U.S. drone was first shown in a video Iran released to the media last Thursday (December 8). Amir-Ali Hajizadeh, commander of the Revolutionary Guards Air Force, said in the video that the Iranians had obtained information according to which the advanced, highly-sensitive drone was supposed to enter Iranian air space, and that it was intercepted by Iranian forces in the eastern part of the country almost undamaged (Fars, December 8).

The daily Keyhan referred to the incident as an unprecedented technological and military achievement for Iran, and a severe defeat for the United States in its campaign against Iran. An editorial published by the daily, titled "Strategic blow”, said that after the riots the United States planned in the summer of 2009 failed, it continued exerting heavy pressure on Iran while mobilizing the international community. However, the policy of pressure and sanctions produced absolutely no results and was unable to compromise Iran’s status and strength. The downing of the U.S. drone has once again proven Iran’s strength versus the technological capabilities of the large powers. While President Obama continues making statements and threats against Iran, the latter clearly demonstrates its scientific, technological, intelligence, and military strength (Keyhan, December 10).

Another article published by Keyhan said that Iran has yet to reveal all that it’s capable of, and that the United States, Britain, and Israel cannot take a military action against it as they are unaware of its military capabilities. In the past two years, the Americans and their British and Israeli allies have entered a new phase in the intelligence war against Iran. The war, which manifested itself in the killing of Iranian nuclear scientists and the virus attack on Iran’s nuclear facilities, was unable to stop the nuclear program. Iran has surprised the United States by bringing down the drone just as Hezbollah surprised Israel with its capabilities in the second Lebanon war. The exposure of the American agents who operated in Iran and Lebanon and the downing of the drone indicate that the intelligence nightmares of the United States are coming true one by one (Keyhan, December 11).

The daily Javan argued that the capture of the drone reflects a new Iranian strategy rather than simply demonstrating Iran’s technological and military achievements. Iran’s ability to respond to the drone’s entry into its air space shows that it has begun the implementation of a new strategy, one based on threat for threat. According to this strategy, Iran will no longer simply react to threats against it, but will also launch initiatives of its own (Javan, December 8).

The daily also claimed that the United States was shocked when it realized that, not only did the pressure and sanctions by the West fail to beat Iran into submission, they even propelled its technological and military progress. The improvement in Iran’s military and electronic defense capabilities is the result of the United States’ hostility towards it, Javan said. The Americans estimated that Iran’s capabilities are restricted to the development of its missile industry; however, the capture of the drone proves that the Americans can no longer wage the same kind of classical electronic war against Iran as they did against Iraq in 2003 (Javan, December 10).

U.S. drone crash in Iranian territory brings joy and protest

The enthusiasm over the downing of the drone was accompanied by vehement protest of its incursion into Iranian air space. The Foreign Ministry summoned the ambassador of Switzerland in Tehran, who represents the interests of the United States in Iran, and the Afghani ambassador in Tehran to protest the entry of the drone from Afghanistan to Iran. In addition, Mohammad Khazaee, Iran’s ambassador to the U.N., sent a letter to that organization’s secretary-general condemning the incursion and demanding that effective, clear action be taken against the United States to put an end to its hostile, illegal, and dangerous actions, which, he said, contradict the U.N. charter and violate Iran’s sovereignty (IRNA, December 9).

Kazem Jalali, spokesman for the Majles National Security and Foreign Policy Committee, asked the Foreign Ministry to seriously deal with the complaint Iran lodged to the U.N. against the United States. He defined the interception of the drone as a big success for Iran, and reported that the Majles Foreign Affairs and Security Committee intends to discuss the incident in a special session (Fars, December 11). Hossein Ebrahimi, vice chairman of the committee, called on the U.N. Security Council to condemn the United States for the incursion into Iran’s air space, and announced that the Iranian armed forces will soon be able to produce a drone similar to the one in question using their advanced scientific capabilities (Fars, December 11). 

Outrage in Iran over opening of U.S. "virtual embassy”

The launch of the online U.S. embassy drew strong criticism from Iran, which claimed that the embassy will be used for espionage and subversion and is part of the psychological warfare campaign waged by the United States against Iran. The website—a "virtual embassy” in Iran—was launched last week by the American administration. According to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, the embassy is meant to be a bridge between the United States and the Iranian people, and advance understanding between the two countries. Just one day after it was launched, the virtual embassy website (http://iran.usembassy.gov) was blocked by the Iranian authorities.

Foreign Ministry Spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast said that, by launching the virtual embassy, the United States admitted to making a big mistake when it cut off its relations with the Iranian people. He said that opening the embassy will not make up for that mistake and will not enable the United States to send a different message to Iranians than the one it has been sending for the past several decades through imposing sanctions, bringing down a civilian aircraft in the Persian Gulf (in 1988), fighting against the technological progress of Iranian scientists, making false accusations against Iran, and providing support for anti-Iranian terrorist organizations. The problem is that Washington never listened to the messages of the Iranian people, which include support for independence, freedom, and the Islamic republic, Mehmanparast said (IRNA, December 8). Intelligence Minister Heydar Moslehi defined the virtual embassy as a trap designed to recruit spies in Iran (Fars, December 12)

http://sikhoonak.blogfa.com
"Virtual spies’ nest” (http://sikhoonak.blogfa.com)

Strong criticism against the launch of the virtual embassy was also heard from the Majles. Alaeddin Boroujerdi, chairman of the Majles National Security and Foreign Policy Committee, said that the launch of the virtual embassy shows lack of respect from the United States for the rights of the people of Iran, and that if U.S. administration officials had respect for Iranians, they would not be asking for fingerprints from Iranian-born citizens who come into the United States (Fararu, December 7).

Esma’il Kowsari, deputy chairman of the Majles National Security and Foreign Policy Committee, said that, as long as the American administration does not change its policy towards Iran, the Iranian people will not believe its two-faced policy. In an interview to ISNA News Agency, Kowsari said that the launch of the virtual embassy is another way for Iran’s enemies to attain their objectives, but that it will produce no results whatsoever unless accompanied by a change in the United States’ policy. Kowsari estimated that the website established by the Americans will remain online for no more than six months to a year, and suggested that the United States provide a solution to the problems facing the American people before meddling in the internal affairs of other nations (ISNA, December 7).

Majles member Hassan Ghafouri-Fard strongly condemned the launch of the virtual embassy, saying that the Iranian people have no interested in having any kind of relations with the United States, even on the virtual embassy level. He termed the launch of the embassy as a "new conspiracy” by the United States, adding that its main goal is to create a divide between the people and the government (Fararu, December 7). Hashmatollah Falahatpisheh, chairman of the Majles Foreign Relations Committee, said that the virtual embassy has been established for purposes of espionage. He added that the embassy violates international treaties and is part of an American initiative to step up pressure on Iran (Mehr, December 7).

Iran’s conservative media also reacted strongly to the launch of the virtual U.S. embassy. The daily Javan said that the embassy’s objective is to collect intelligence, a tactic the United States previously employed in other places across the globe, including Colombia and India. Without an embassy in Tehran, the United States cannot collect intelligence on the internal situation in Iran, and many American experts on Iran believe that the ineffective policy of the White House towards Iran is largely the result of lack of information on the happenings in that country. In recent years the United States has attempted to collect intelligence on Iran from its embassies in neighboring countries by contacting Iranian citizens, and it now aims to collect intelligence through the virtual embassy without causing problems for the citizens interested in contacting it (Javan Online, December 6).

The conservative daily Qods claimed that the establishment of the virtual embassy is an illegal action in international relations, since the American administration launched a website providing consular services to Iranians without the agreement of Iran’s government. Qods called on the Iranian authorities to lodge a complaint to international authorities against the United States (Qods, December 8). Fars News Agency also claimed that the launch of the embassy goes against international treaties on diplomatic relations between countries. The American administration cannot claim that the website is unofficial since it is operated directly by the U.S. Department of State, with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton personally involved, and even provides consular services to Iranian citizens. The Iranian authorities need to protest the opening of the virtual embassy and lodge a complaint to international authorities on grounds that the actions of the United States constitute a new instance of espionage against Iran, Fars said (Fars, December 7).

Annual battle for approval of national budget begins

Earlier this week the government approved the main points of the national budget for the next Iranian year (March 2011-March 2012), and is expected to submit it to the approval of the Majles in the next several days. As in the past, the political power struggle between the Majles and the government will likely come into play during the discussions on the approval of the budget, particularly when considering how close they are to the next Majles elections, slated for this coming March.

The Majles is supposed to approve the budget proposal by the end of the Iranian year. Last year the budget was approved about two months late as a result of a considerable delay in the submission of the budget proposal by the government, and the strong differences of opinion between the two authorities over the details of the budget.

Speaking at a Majles session, Majles Deputy Speaker Mohammad-Reza Bahonar reported that so far, Majles Speaker Ali Larijani has sent to the president two official letters demanding that he submit the budget proposal to the Majles as soon as possible. This week Majles member Mostafa Kavakebian demanded that the government promptly submit the budget proposal, saying that the legal date by which the proposal was supposed to have been submitted to the Majles has already passed. Kavakebian warned that unless the budget is submitted in the next several days, severe problems may arise, since Majles members will be busy with the election campaign in the next several weeks. The Majles member also criticized the government’s management of the budget, claiming that even though its revenues came up to more than 720 billion dollars, it borrowed a considerable amount of money from the Central Bank. He added that many development projects were not executed since the government did not allocate the necessary budgets for them (Alef, December 11).

Annual battle for approval of national budget begins

Mehr News Agency reported this week that the budget proposal which the government intends to submit to the approval of the Majles will likely address the impact of the economic sanctions imposed on Iran. According to the report, the budget will reflect possible scenarios aimed to provide a response to the possible drop in state revenues in case the international sanctions become more severe.

The news agency also reported that, as the budget was being finalized, experts on behalf of the government looked into various scenarios having to do with Iran’s foreign currency policy in light of the continuing devaluation of the national currency against the dollar, as well as scenarios having to do with oil prices. The budget proposal will also address the next phase of the subsidy policy reform (Mehr, December 12).

Meanwhile, a senior official in the Supreme Audit Court of Iran (SAC) confirmed this week that Iran’s national budget showed a deficit in the first six months of the current Iranian year (March-September 2011). Hamid Teymouri, deputy SAC director on judicial and parliamentary affairs, did not indicate how severe the deficit is, but estimated that a budget deficit will occur in the last six months of the year as well. He reported that the SAC intends to present to the Majles a detailed report on Iran’s budget in the first six months of the year, even before the budget proposal for the next year is submitted by the government to the approval of the Majles (Farda, December 12).

At the same time, SAC Director Abdolreza Rahmani Fazli accused the government of exceeding its budget. Among other things, he claimed that the government did not deposit the necessary funds for the foreign currency reserves fund, and exceeded the budget allocated for the subsidy policy reform (ISNA, December 11).

Majles member Seyyed Reza Akrami also discussed the budget deficit and said experts believe that this year’s deficit will reach 40 thousand billion tomans (nearly 37 billion dollars). He added that the deficit largely stems from the faulty implementation of the subsidy policy reform (Aftab, December 11).

Iran responds to Battlefield 3 with Assault on Tel-Aviv

Behrouz Mina’i, chairman of the National Foundation for Computer Games, reported this week that Iranian game designers are currently hard at work on the video game Assault on Tel-Aviv in response to Battlefield 3.

When asked by a reporter for Fars News Agency about Iran’s reaction to Battlefield 3, a game recently banned by the Iranian authorities, Mina’i said that Iran recently sent a protest letter to Electronic Arts, the distributor of the game, but has yet to receive a response. He added that Iran’s strategy is based on "attack for attack”, and since the United States is ruled by Israel and is more concerned with an attack on Tel-Aviv than on Washington, Iran will respond to Battlefield 3 by developing the video game Assault on Tel-Aviv. Meanwhile, a number of Iranian video game developers expressed their willingness to help develop Iran’s "reprisal” game (Fars, December 10).

Several weeks ago Iranian authorities decided to impose a total ban on selling the game Battlefield 3, which portrays a U.S. attack on Iran and features a scenario where U.S. troops invade the country on a hunt for a nuclear bomb. The game includes a multiplayer map where battles are fought in the heart of Tehran.

The internal security forces warned computer stores across Iran not to sell copies of the game, illegally smuggled into Iran. In addition, thousands of Iranian youngsters signed an online petition to protest the game. The petition states that even though Battlefield 3 is an imaginary game, its distribution at the present timing is aimed to advance the international campaign waged by the United States in an effort to propagate fear against Iran (Fars, November 29)

Iran responds to Battlefield 3 with Assault on Tel-Aviv

In recent years the Iranian authorities have made use of computer games as part of the efforts to advance the regime’s objectives with domestic public opinion. A computer game titled Special Ops was released in the summer of 2007. It followed the attempt of the commander of Iran’s special intelligence forces to rescue two Iranian nuclear scientists taken captive by the United States in Iraq. Other games developed in recent years explore the Islamic revolution and the Iran-Iraq War.

These games are developed and distributed under the leadership of the National Computer Game Foundation. It was established in 2006 by the Supreme Council of the Cultural Revolution and is supervised by the Ministry of Islamic Guidance. Among other things, the foundation publishes lists of "inappropriate” games that contain violence, sex, alcohol and drug consumption, offense against Muslims or Islam, or secular views. In addition, the foundation is responsible for developing, encouraging, and distributing computer games that promote the values of the Islamic revolution and Iranian Islamic identity, as well as monitoring all the activities pertaining to the computer game industry in Iran. 

Pistachio nuts, pre-Islamic tradition, and politics

The chairman of Iran’s Pistachio Association reported this week that pistachio prices have gone up by 10 to 15 percent this year as a result of a decrease in pistachio production and the local currency’s loss against the U.S. dollar. This year, good-quality pistachios sell for as much as 10,000 tomans (over 9 dollars) per kilogram (about 2.2 lbs).

In a conversation with ISNA News Agency’s agriculture reporter, Mohsen Jalalpour said that 150 thousand tons of pistachio nuts were harvested across the country this past year, 40 thousand tons less than the preceding year. Of the 150 tons of pistachios harvested, forty thousand tons were exported by Iran abroad, mostly to China. Jalalpour noted that Iranian pistachio exporters face stiff competition from their counterparts in the United States, whose pistachios are cheaper than those produced in Iran (ISNA, December 12).

In recent years the Iranian pistachio market is undergoing a severe crisis driven mostly by drought and water shortage in Kerman Province. The province, particularly the city of Rafsanjan, is the center of pistachio production in Iran. Rafsanjan is the ancestral home of the Rafsanjani family, which includes Ali-Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani, former president and chairman of the Expediency Discernment Council. The family has many pistachio plantations, a major source of the high-ranking politician’s wealth.

The chairman of the Pistachio Association stressed that, despite the decrease in the supply of pistachios, the nuts will not be in shortage ahead of Yalda, which will be marked next week in Iran.

Pistachio nuts, pre-Islamic tradition, and politics

Yalda Night (December 21), the longest night of the year, symbolizes the beginning of the winter season. The holiday dates back to pre-Islamic Zoroastrian tradition. On Yalda, families traditionally get together to eat dried fruit, watermelons, and pomegranates. Tradition has it that eating summer fruits in early winter ensures good health and keeps disease at bay during the cold season. Storytelling and reading the poems of the 14th century poet Hafez are also customary.

Like the Iranian New Year (Nowruz), the regime attempted to abolish the Yalda festivities after the Islamic revolution, but without success. In recent years conservative clerics in Iran have expressed their reservations over holding the Yalda ceremonies in the Islamic republic, and criticized the mention of the ceremonies on Iran’s official media.

Pictures of the week: production of brooms in Mazandaran Province

Production of brooms in Mazandaran Province

Production of brooms in Mazandaran Province

Production of brooms in Mazandaran Province

Production of brooms in Mazandaran Province

Production of brooms in Mazandaran Province